Make Bird Feeders for Garden or Balcony Railing

Make Bird Feeders for Garden or Balcony Railing

These cold months when everything is under the spell of morning rime is the perfect period to make bird feeders. Especially in regions where the houses are built thinly.

Install the bird feeders in the garden or in the balcony near a wide window or balcony door and check for little birdies. These holidays dad's and mine favorite hobby was to stalk for colorful visitors. Our usual suspects were some selective finches, many pesky sparrows and one dapper robin. We even managed to take many close-up photos of them, check here.

For those who have a garden:

Having a garden means that you are a click closer to the fields, which brings you closer to a wide range of possible regulars for your bird feeders. And it's very easy to make them.

Supplies: plastic bottles, branches, rope, atlacoll ( or any wood glue), lancet, a big iron rod <1,5m, twine, dry bread and grains
Take the plastic bottle and make hole on its bottom in the diameter of the metal rod. With the lancet cut in 2-3 bottle's spots an upside "Π" shape to create some folding to the outside screens. These will protect the food from the humidity in case of rain. Secure the rod in the ground and pass its upper side through the bottle. Now, using some twine tie firmly 1-2 branches on the rod, long enough to reach under your cut screens. In that way the birdies will jump easier into the feeder. Then tie some more skewer sticks on the bigger branches for more standing and moving spots. Drop a few drops of glue on the twines for better grip. Fill your feeders with dry bread and a variety of grains and expect several feathered friends .

Make sure that your metal rod is higher than 1,5m long and that the feeder is installed somewhere that has has clear viewing for the birds to check easily for stalking predators (eg the neighborhood's nasty cats will check the bird feeder quicker that you can imagine).


For those who have a balcony:


For those of you who live in the heart of the city or even in the suburbs, but you don't have a garden, there is a solution for bird feeders too.

Supplies: milk carton, lancet, branches, newspapers, wire, atlacoll, dry bread and grains

Take a carton of milk. With the lancet cut in 3 spots an upside "Π" shape to create some folding to the outside screens. Link the screens with newspapers pieces that you moistured with atlacoll. Put some more atlacoll in any cracks to waterproof your little kiosk from the rain. Under each opening make a hole in the diameter of a little branch and secure it there with some atlacoll. Tie the feeder on the balcony railing and you are ready to go. Make sure that you lay some newspapers under the feeder in case of bird droppings.

Wait for another post to check what visitors our camera caught. There were some colorful exceptional visitors for sure  :)

Credits: Author & Photos by: Deborah Cortes

4 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Retro Peter-Pan Ornaments

retro peter pan sketches ornaments.jpg

Hey guys! Just dropping by to share some vintage Peter-Pan ornaments that I came up with. Peter Pan's story about the boy that never grew old withholds a dreamy sparkle that matches perfectly with the Christmas spirit.

Print them on matte heavier paper (or regular paper), fold them in two, and secure the edge of a thread using a staple or glue. So download them HERE and merry little Christmas ya all! :)

 ❤

1 Comment

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Golden Stars Headband

Gold stars Headband- glitter crown.jpg

Aww these stars. From the moment I made them, I fell for them and now I want to wear them all the times. Let aside the fact that there isn't any event to be worthy enough to accommodate them. When they enter the room, all the other headbands become pale and sear. They are so perfect, that my words are needless to describe how perfect they are.

DIY Gold stars Headband- glitter crown Tutorial.jpg
DIY Gold stars Headband- glitter crown Tutorial.jpg

1. Firstly you cut out of paper or carton stars of same /different size.

2. Mix atlacoll with water in ratio of 6:1 and end up with a mix like marmalade. With a thick brush cover the 2 sides of the star with the glue.

DIY Gold stars Headband- glitter crown Tutorial.jpg
DIY Gold stars Headband- glitter crown Tutorial.jpg

3. Press the star in the glitter, so that it will stick on the star's surfaces.

4. Let it dry and then cover it again with the glue, toss it in the glitter, cover it with glue to secure the glitter. Do that 3 times.

DIY Gold stars Headband- glitter crown Tutorial.jpg
DIY Gold stars Headband- glitter crown Tutorial.jpg

5. Let the stars to dry vertically.

6. Secure the stars on a headband of your hair's natural color with a small amount of atlacoll on their back. Let them dry and tadaa!

DIY Gold stars Headband- glitter crown.jpg
DIY Gold stars Headband- glitter crown.jpg
DIY Gold stars Headband- glitter crown.jpg
DIY Gold stars Headband- glitter crown.jpg
DIY Gold stars Headband- glitter crown Tutorial.jpg

Me Wearing: Headband/Handmade, Sweater/my mum's, Skirt/Handmade, Boots/Vintage

Credits:  Outfit photos by: Vasilis Ioakeimidis

5 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace

Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace.jpg

It's true that I have fling with statement necklaces, made of all kind of materials. The other day I fell on that diy carton vase and the idea for that necklace landed like a meteor in my mind. I had to make such a necklace. And so I did. The first impressions by my friends were very surprising as they were a mixture of: "oh it must be really heavy" and "is it made by metal?". Well no friends, it's only light, cheap carton. Yeah

Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace Tutorial.jpg
Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace Tutorial.jpg

You will need: cardboard from a cereal box, ruler, diabetes, scissors, scalpel toothpicks, instant dry  glue, thick cardboard, atlacoll glue (or mod podge), glitter, tempera colors, small clothespins, brush, plastic disposable box, thin wire , clasps for necklaces

1. For a necklace exactly like mine, you will need cycles with 4cm and 3,5 cm diameter. Pull line segments of 4 (and 3,5) cm. In the middle of the line is (O) spot and in the ends the (A) and (D) ones. Make a cycles with an (O) center that intersects (A) and (D) too. Then with the (D) as a center pull semicircles, that pass over the (O) and intersect with your first cycles in the (B) and (C) spots. Join the (A), (B) and (C) and make your equilateral triangles.

2. Use a ruler to fold the outer parts of the triangles’ sides.

Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace Tutorial.jpg
Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace Tutorial.jpg

3. Glue the “ears” of the cycles (the outer parts of the triangles’ sides) with instant dry glue and secure with clothespins until dry.

4. Think of any shape for necklace and in case you want to duplicate mine, here are exact cycles’ diameters for you.

Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace Tutorial.jpg
Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace Tutorial.jpg

5. You may notice that the glued cycles have a tendency to fold inward, so create a base for your necklace by patronizing the base triangles only, the outboard ears should not be included, using thick cardboard. Determine which side is the top of the necklace and with a scalpel’s help open 2 small holes to pass the wire (or whatever strap you wish) and secure them with 2 toothpicks to ensure that will stay open.

6. Blend atlacoll (or mod podge) and water with a ratio of 5:1 (you want a sticky mixture here) and add any tempera color you want your necklace to have (black for me, for a dark gray shade). Save some of your mixture in a separate container and in the first one add the glitter until you have a uniform granular texture.

Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace Tutorial.jpg
Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace Tutorial.jpg

7. When the 1st cover dries, apply a 2nd one using the no-glitter-mixture pass to fill gaps and secure the glitter.
8. When the 2nd cover is dry too, remove the toothpicks. Also, paint the back of the necklace and put your wire/strap on, along with the clasps. You may secure the strap on the back of the necklace with a little of atlacoll.

Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace.jpg

On the left you can see the necklace with the 2nd cover of glue applied, while on the right it’s the same one with the 1st one only on. For the 2nd cover you can use a lighter color if you don’t want to overshadow the glitter so much like me.

Combine it with a monochromatic blouse and a skirt or shorts or jeans.  Here's my to-go outfit for it.

Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace.jpg
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Recycled Cardboard Glitter Necklace.jpg
outfit green skirt - grey shirt casual.jpg

Find more necklace tutorials here. Happy crafting!

 

Credits: Author and DIY photos by: Deborah Cortes // Outfit photos by: Sin Axis

6 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

How to make candle bottles

Make Candle bottles  (3).jpg

Here's an easy and quick way to fill –pay attention to excesses – your space with long candles, without paying extra money for candlesticks. The –well known- secret is to use any old bottles that you may have to uphold the candles.

Make Candle bottles  (1).jpg
Make Candle bottles  (2).jpg

:: Supplies: long candles, a lancet, old bottles

Get some white or beige long candles from any home ware store or from any store selling specifically candles. Then, with the lancet, scrape the bottom of the candle, so that it fits to the bottle’s mouth. Tip: Make sure that the candle doesn’t tilts, if you want to avoid the wax drops on your table.

Make Candle bottles  (4).jpg
6 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

DIY: Statement Clay Necklace

statement+clay+necklace+%25286%2529.jpg

♫ ♪ Overwerk - Daybreak

For a long time now, I am dreaming for a nice statement necklace with stones and this is the best one that I could find. However, every single necklace that I have seen had something wrong. It may was its color, the chain, the stones’ size, always something was missing or something needed to be changed. Until I decided to create my own statement necklace, only I decided to make it with clay. Yeah, clay.


Supplies you will need: white clay that dries without baking it, a scalpel with a broad blade, tempera colors (I used white and black), thin flexible wire, a bowl with water, atlacoll glue, fishing line, circular metal rail as the necklace’s basis (you will find these in diy supply stores)

statement+clay+necklace+%252810%2529.jpg

1. Initially you cut the clay into small pieces, a little larger than the ideal size of the necklace’s stones.

2. With the scalpel’s blade subtract clay and create polygonal surfaces on your pieces. Be sure to dip the blade in the water every now and then, ‘cause a wet blade cuts smoother.

statement+clay+necklace+%25285%2529.jpg
statement+clay+necklace+%25284%2529.jpg

3. Then, place the stones as you want them in the necklace and paint them with the tempera colors. I went for the classic white/black combination. If you stick to this too, paint the stones, which are supposed to stay white too. By this you will cover the clay’s natural dirty white-grey white, with a much brighter one.

Tip: Take a photo the stones’ layout, so that you will be able to re-create it with ease.

4. When the paint dries, create shadows and illuminations for a more three-dimensional effect. Lay the stones in front of a light source (eg a window) and paint with tones of grey the shaded part of the white stones and the illuminated parts of the black stones.

 

statement+clay+necklace+%252811%2529.jpg

5. When the stones are completely dry, place them again as they should be in the necklace and leave spaces of 2-3mm between them. Then cut the wire into pieces of 1.5-2cm. and stick with atlacoll on the stones.

6. I suggest that you start gluing pieces of wire on the larger stones, to let them dry (a.k.a. let atlacoll to become transparent) and then glue on their wires the smallest stones.

Tip: If you want to bend the tip a wire, hold its base with your finger. Otherwise, glue and wire will come off the stone’s surface.

statement+clay+necklace+%25289%2529.jpg

Once you have all your stones glued together, grizzle a little atlacoll between the stones’ gaps for extra stability. When the necklace dries thoroughly, center it over a rail –necklace’s base and with the fishing line tie the outboard and center wires with the rail. And ready you are.

And here it is. Sparklingly ready and worn. This sweet clay necklace may the best-favorite necklace, that I have made.

statement+clay+necklace+%25288%2529.jpg

PS. All the photos are taken under different lighting conditions, cause because the drying’s delays, the necklace took me 2-3 days to make. So pictures were taken different hours of the days.

statement+clay+necklace+%25287%2529.jpg
statement+clay+necklace+%25282%2529.jpg

So what's your opinion? Would you make a similar one?

 

8 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!