"Floating" hanging plant: easy and quick diy

Floating hanging plant easy and quick | from In Whirl of Inspiration

Floating hanging plant easy and quick | from In Whirl of Inspiration

I have news! Do you remember all these tiny pots that you have lined up on your desk (they are so cute I know)? Well you can hang them over your desk. You will save space a tons of space and you will give your wall a joyful dose of chlorophyll. Plus, it is super easy to hang them.

Floating hanging plant easy and quick | from In Whirl of Inspiration

Materials: a sheet of PVC, string, clay pot, scissors, Blu-tack, a plant that fits in your pot

Floating hanging plant easy and quick | from In Whirl of Inspiration

1. Draw the diameter of the pot's open side on the PVC. Cut the circle and then cut a cross in the center of it. Start cutting the inside of the circle to create a ring through which the pot fits to pass and yet doesn't fall from its tip.

Floating hanging plant easy and quick | from In Whirl of Inspiration
Floating hanging plant easy and quick | from In Whirl of Inspiration

2. Calculate the distance between the spot from which you want to hang your pot and the one you want it to float. You can hang it from eg. a pre-existing nail/ one you put yourself, an exposed pipe, from your bookcase. Then cut 2 pieces of string with twice the length of the calculated one + 3cm. Pass the strings around the PVX ring and make a knot of the 4 ends. 

Floating hanging plant easy and quick | from In Whirl of Inspiration

3. Put the plant in the pot, hang it and adjust the string around the ring so that the plant hangs with your desired angle.

If you want a more convenient construction to give a boost chloroflyllis in your area, why not try these balls of moss? Now for the Christmas season is so beautiful!

4. You can secure the edge of the pot with a bit of Blu-tack on the surface behind it to avoid shaking.

If you want to try another idea for hanging plants, what's about this garland with moss balls? It's perfect for Christmas seasona and any season.

So simple and easy. How do you hang pots and plants in your home? I would love to see your ideas. Please tell me in the comments below. Happy crafting!

Comment

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

How to make coasters from dried blood orange slices

How to make coasters from dried blood orange slices (via inwhirlofinspiration.com)

Do you know what comes together with the summer? An  insane consumption of cold beverages: cold water, cold juices, cold coffees and the list goes and goes on. With that said, I was thinking that my new cold buddies might need some fancy coasters to match their awesomeness. The possibilities of making handmade coasters are endless of course, but I wanted something that would look good, but also would smell nicely. Dried citrus create the best winter decorations, especially in conjunction with cinnamon and cloves, but no one thought to use them during spring/summer time, right? Well here we go!

How to make coasters from dried blood orange slices (via inwhirlofinspiration.com) 2

Supplies: 1 blood orange, crystallic transparent glue (atlakolla the Mod podge), brush, knife, oven

1. I used blood oranges, because I liked their vivid color and their big surface, but feel free to experiment with any kind of citruses. Cut them in as straight slices as possible with thickness of 1,5cm (when they are dried they shrink and you don't want excess shrinkage). They have to be straight, cause even the slightest angle will make them inappropriate for holding mugs with water.

How to make coasters from dried blood orange slices (via inwhirlofinspiration.com) 3

2. Put the slices in the oven at 50°C for 4 hours to dry without being burned ( and without being cooked). If your oven has the option of warm air that's even better. When they are completely dry, they are ready. Take them off the oven and select the most even ones and if necessary scrape any surface potrusions with a knife.

How to make coasters from dried blood orange slices (via inwhirlofinspiration.com) 4

3. Then mix a little glue with water (in the ratio of 6:1) and cover the slices with one layer of the mixture. That will make the slices a little more persistent to weights and waterproof. You can let them dry naturally, but I put the, again in the 50°C for another 5 minutes since I was extremely impatient.

How to make coasters from dried blood orange slices (via inwhirlofinspiration.com) 5

4. This was one of the most quick and easy crafts I have ever made. Maybe the drying might take some time, but the real time of making the coasters is maximum 20 minutes.

How to make coasters from dried blood orange slices (via inwhirlofinspiration.com) 6

If you want more crafts inspired by nature, what about these garland with moss balls or this unique necklace made from pistachio shells?

Credits | Text & Photographs: Debbie Kortes

Comment

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration

If it's not your first time in this site, you might have noticed that I go crazy making colorful and strange things and wearing them with pride and joy in public. In this list of diys first come the necklaces made from unexpected materials and second the earrings. And althought I am cursed to be allergic in all kinds of metalllic materials that penetrates my earlobe, I don't have the biggest collection of big, dramatic earrings (as I would love to). Only some clipped, light ones. With that said, clipped and covered with confetti will be today's happy earrings.

And to make long story short,  I proudly presnt you the diy that will make your day!

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration

What you will need: colorful confetti , atlacoll (also called wood glue), PVC sheet, earrings clips or regular ones, scissors, silicone gun (optional)

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration

1. First draw your earring's shape on a piece of paper. Then Put the sheet of PVC on the patron and copy it. Cut your shape and voila.

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration

2. Apply a thin layer of atlacoll on one side of the earring and dip it into confetti. The purpose of this fun procedure is to cover all the side with confetti, without leaving naked glue parts (the glue turns transparent when it dries so you don't want transparent gaps). Let it to dry and apply do the same on the other side too. I would recommend applying 2 layers of confetti in the front side. Repeat the same with the other earring.

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration

3. If you want to give the earring a rotation better do it as long as the glue doesn't dry, cause otherwise your earring will stop being flexible. When they are absolutely dry, using the silicone pistol glue the earring clips on the back side. If you don't have a silicone gun, you can always do the same with a little ammount of atlacoll. Afterwards secure any almost-flting cobfetti and cut the excess confetti from the edges.

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration
How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration

4. Wear your new cuties and collect your friends' compliments. Arent't they absolutely perfect?

And with an excess of excitement I announce you that you can buy a customized pair of the earrings in our etsy shop or buy an diy kit to make them on your own.

Credits | Writing & Photographs : Debbie Kortes

8 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Recycled lamp fixture made from paper towel rolls & aluminum foil

Recycled lamp fixture made from paper towel rolls & aluminum foil.jpg

 

My kitchen’s lamp fixture was a bare lamp holder for a long time, since I didn’t know what to do with it. You know that I spend so much time in the kitchen preparing delis, so if I was going to have a lamp fixture it would be something that would create  a nice focused light. And also I was collecting kitchen paper towel rolls for a long time with out knowing what I would like to do with them.

Until it hit me, a lamp fixture made by kitchen paper rolls.  Boom!

Recycled lamp fixture made from paper towel rolls & aluminum foil. jpg

Supplies: kitchen paper rolls, aluminum foil, silicone glue gun, atlacoll, brown recycled wrapping paper (or another piece of paper or fabric), jar’s cap, X-acto knife

Recycled lamp fixture made from paper towel rolls & aluminum foil 2.jpg

1. Cut the kitchen paper roll alongside, with the knife and end up with an open rectangle.

2. At the bottom corner of the rectangular put liquid silicone and glue that corner with the next triangle’s one diagonally. Press it for some seconds and it’s ready.  

Recycled lamp fixture made from paper towel rolls & aluminum foil 3.jpg


3. Glue 3-4 of them together and test if they can form a closed cone when wrapped around the lampholder. Better the upper cone's hole to be a little larger than the lampholder diameter, than smaller (for me: 4 rolls end up giving a small upper cone’s hole and the 5 gave a larger one, so I went for the 5 ones)

Recycled lamp fixture made from paper towel rolls & aluminum foil 4.jpg


4. The internal side of the lamp (the one facing towards the lamp) will be covered with aluminum foil. Don't mind if the foil can be showed to the external side, that one will also be covered with paper. Add silicone glue between the gaps and edges of the aluminum foil, so that you have a compact, solid surface.

Recycled lamp fixture made from paper towel rolls & aluminum foil 5.jpg

5. Place the open cone on a big piece of recycled brown paper (or any other print or fabric) and draw its pattern. Let 2-3cm of excess paper around its perimeter when cutting it. Fold these 2-3cm “ears” inwards, put silicone on them and glue on the external side of the open cone. Add silicone in any big openings and anywhere else needed. Let it dry and then close the cone and keep it fixed like that using a big metal clip. You can do that with glue too, but I love to idea of hanging and unhanging it whenever I feel so. Plus there is 6. below, where you have to open again the cone. So use a clip. 

Recycled lamp fixture made from paper towel rolls & aluminum foil 6.jpg


6. There is the possibility that when closing the cone, the upper cone's hole won't stuck on the lampholder (eg. like in my situation). If that happens, so the following. Take an old jar’s cap and find its center. Cut a circle around it (big enough for the lamp’s cable to pass through fit) and cut its radius too. Beware of your fingers and do that on a concrete floor, not on wood or tiles please.

Recycled lamp fixture made from paper towel rolls & aluminum foil 7.jpg

7. Set the cap-holder around the cable and then on that place the cone-lamp fixture. And it's ready.

The foil in the fixture’s inside creates a very beautiful focused light and because of fixture’s structure the upper side of the room remains some tones darker than the lower part of the room. Nice effect, huh?

Recycled lamp fixture made from paper towel rolls & aluminum foil 8.jpg

Happy crafting and if you want more home diys check my crafts index here.

2 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

How to make a unique necklace by pistachio shells

 Photo by   Vasilis Ioakeimidis

What they say about the handmade pieces, that the inspiration for them can come from almost anywhere, it's completely true. In these cases of unexpected inspiration, the joy of creation is even greater.

For instance: You are eating pistachios while watching a movie that you hoped you liked more. Alongside toy empathize the main character's drama by wondering how could you reuse this compact (the shells) raw material creatively. Op, bright idea. You stop the movie, get up, go to the kitchen, remove peels and soft pieces off the shells, wash them and leave them to dry, cause tomorrow a total transformation is waiting for them. Going to sleep happily. The -creative- end.

How to make a unique necklace by pistachio shells, the diy 2
How to make a unique necklace by pistachio shells, the diy 3

You will need: silicone glue gun, string for necklace, peanut shells, brushes, tempera colors, glitter, scissors, jump rings and secure ends for the necklace

1. Arrange the shells in the shape that the final necklace will have, with their openings facing downwards.

How to make a unique necklace by pistachio shells, the diy 4
How to make a unique necklace by pistachio shells, the diy 5

2. Using the silicone gun glue the all shells, by securing those which contact. Beware with the glue's flow, this is of course the back side of the necklace and you are entitled to make a few more messes.

3. Glue the secure ends with the string's end and press the secure end's ears to grip well (use a handle pliers or a pair of scissors to do so).

How to make a unique necklace by pistachio shells, the diy 6

4. Having done the security ends, cut a generous length of string on each side and check to find the in which height of your neck you want the necklace to be. If using hard strings before securing it to the necklace note to have the concave string's side facing to the inside-to your neck.

How to make a unique necklace by pistachio shells, the diy 7

5. Break a little piece on the top of the last shell in each side, so that the string can fit inside the shell's pit. Fill the pit with silicone and the dip the string inside to stick really well.

How to make a unique necklace by pistachio shells, the diy 8

6. I liked my necklace to be black, but you can paint yours whatever color you desire using tempera colors. If you paint it a lighter color, go with a lighter shade to cover the shell's color and create a base. Then use darker shades to the diagonal bottom corners and lighter ones to the diametrically diagonal up ones. This trick will create the effect of artificial shadows and the necklace will look very impressive. I also added some glitter in the shell's pit, so when light falls on it its really cool.

How to make a unique necklace by pistachio shells, the diy 9

7. Now, for the back side, in order to hide the bumps of glue, I painted the necklace one darker hue than the shell's natural color and I added black-gray brushstrokes to the diagonal lower corners to create some artificial shades. So now can be worn by two sides. Win-win!


By the way, every great necklace that respects itself, will ask for a photoshoot to be featured. Vasilis and me satisfied its request by photographing it one warm summer afternoon. See the whole photo shoot here - it was such a fun one to do!

 Photo by   Vasilis Ioakeimidis
 Photo by   Vasilis Ioakeimidis
 Photo by   Vasilis Ioakeimidis

I hope to inspired you to make an original necklace next time you wonder, which one would match with your outfits. Don't be afraid to experiment with shapes and colors.

If you want more necklace inspiration see all my creations here

Comment

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Photoshoot of my new pistachio shells necklace

photoshoot for the pistachio shells necklace, photos by Vasilis Ioakeimidis

Whoever is an amateur or professional photographer here, might have noticed that it's a bit awkward passing from the photographer's "safety" to lens' exposure. Well, I have already the stigma of "Debbie-with-the-fancy-camera", so everyone is so assured of me taking all the trip's/happening's photos and then sharing them to everyone. I am not grumbling here, not at all; I love this role. I am a perfectionist with my memories, so I want to choose what I want to immortalize in my photos. what will I be immortalized. Therefore, as I prefer being behind my camera, it took me long to start appearing in the blog.  I believe that a start was made for the needs of photoshooting my necklaces and this new necklace couldn't be an exception and be left in the dark.

Oh this necklace is perfect and maybe one of my best ideas. It is made from peanut shells, glued with silicone and painted with tempera colors. The raw material is is transformed so much, the only thing unaltered is the marvelous structure of the shell. And you are left to wonder, the raw material of this necklace. And it's so special, it can be worn by two sides creating a different texture every time.

The whole procedure of making is HERE. Also, if you want to check the rest of my necklaces, find them all here!

All photos are shot by Vasilis Ioakeimidis

photoshoot for the pistachio shells necklace, photos by Vasilis Ioakeimidis

The first side, the one with shells' openings, is black with a little black glitter in the openings' recesses.

photoshoot for the pistachio shells necklace, photos by Vasilis Ioakeimidis
photoshoot for the pistachio shells necklace, photos by Vasilis Ioakeimidis
necklace made by pistachio shells
photoshoot for the pistachio shells necklace, photos by Vasilis Ioakeimidis

The back side is mustard with black shadows and exploits the curved portions of the shells.

photoshoot for the pistachio shells necklace, photos by Vasilis Ioakeimidis
photoshoot for the pistachio shells necklace, photos by Vasilis Ioakeimidis
Heraklion bay by sunset, Crete
Comment

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!