A salty and sour sauce for your boiled salads

A salty and sour sauce for your boiled salads | from IN WHIRL OF INSPIRATION

Cold, time for two. And by two I mean you and the heartwarming boiled salad you will prepare today. Or is it only me that I tend to eat so many boiled salads during the cold months; boiled zucchini/broccoli/greens you name it, I love them.  With that said I will show you an easy salty and sour sauce you can make to top your salad, which can also replace all the mayonnaisethat goes into potato salads nowadays and it's not the healthiest thing to consume in big quantities (unless it is a homemade one). This sauce will bring the flavor out of the boiled vegetables without oveloading them, trust me.

A salty and sour sauce for your boiled salads - cutting the scallions | from IN WHIRL OF INSPIRATION

You will need (for topping a salad):

  • ½ tsp Dijon mustard or homemade mustard
  • 2 scallions
  • 1 ½ juicy lemons
  • 2 tablespoons of virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium pickled cucumbers
  • capers
  • freshly ground pepper and a pinch of salt
  • dill

Procedure:

Chop finely the scallions, the capers and the pickled cucumbers and add them in a small jar together with the mustard, olive oil, the lemon juice, the grounded pepper and dill. Close the lid and shake well until the mixture becomes homogeneous. Try and add salt if needed and top your salad with it.

We added a bit of homemade pickled sea fennel on top, but if you don't have some, how about some pickled purslanes?
 

A salty and sour sauce for your boiled salads | from IN WHIRL OF INSPIRATION

And before I wish you bon appetit, what toppings do you use on your boiled vegetables? I am so curious to know, spill the beans in the comments below if you want. xoxo

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Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

A pesto alternative: with parsley, strawberries, walnuts and feta cheese

A pesto alternative - with parley, strawberries, walnuts and feta cheese (via inwhirlofinspiration.com)1

You know what's the funniest thing that I have heard? "Why to experiment with an already perfect recipe and possibly ruin it?" Maybe some people agree with this, but I don't. Who can define a dish as perfect? And why not try making it more perfect? defined it as perfect? And why not try to do it even more perfect?
An already-close-to-perfection recipe. It gives character to many dishes. But it could be modified to fit with the season's vegetable and fruits or with various local products. This alternative pesto recipe contains parsley and strawberries that are everywhere this season, walnuts instead of pine seeds and feta cheese (so cliche Greek) instead of parmesan. And let the summer vibe rush over your dishes.

A pesto alternative - with parley, strawberries, walnuts and feta cheese (via inwhirlofinspiration.com) 3

Ingredients (for 1 bowl pesto):

1 large bunch of parsley
100 gr. of feta cheese
15-20 medium strawberries
2 cloves of garlic
2 handfuls of walnuts
2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
oregano, salt and pepper

Procedure:

The process is simple: cutting, cutting and more cutting. You can cut all the ingredients on a large board, starting with the toughest and largest pieces (eg. walnuts and garlic) and continue with the softest ones. Then in a big bowl add the chopped ingredients, the olive oil and spices, stir, taste and add anything that misses according to your taste.
The other method is to mash all ingredients in a blender, so much quicker and cleaner, but I don't like the mashed-all-together outcome.  All textures are mashed together and the color is ehmmm not my favorite. ;) But as you wish, serve over bread as a snack or with savory dishes.

A pesto alternative - with parley, strawberries, walnuts and feta cheese (via inwhirlofinspiration.com) 2

If this version is too experimental for you, you can always return to the old safe classic pesto recipe. And here are three of my favorite ways to serve the pesto: on corn on the cob with feta cheese (omg!), with gnocchi and in a quick santwich tomato, prosciutto and a fried egg. 

Credits | Words & photos: Debbie Kortes

Comment

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Salad dressing with blueberries, dijon mustard, olive oil & sesam

Salad dressing with blueberries, dijon mustard, olive oil & sesam | In Whirl of Inspiration

Maybe the good sunny days that are given to us, here in the almost underwater Amsterdam, gave us also joy and lot's of ideas. I don't know. But what I do know is that I have a new discovery for ya' all.  To tell the truth, I am not the dressing-on-salad type of human being. Most of the times a really good quality olive oil does all the dirty(yummy) job. Perhaps though, the lack of accessing this privilege, which was given so generously back in Greece, prompted me to try and put a little bit of variety on the top of my salad.

Salad dressing with blueberries, dijon mustard, olive oil & sesam | In Whirl of Inspiration 2
Salad dressing with blueberries, dijon mustard, olive oil & sesam | In Whirl of Inspiration 3

Ingredients (for two salads):

:: 3 tbsps olive oil

:: 1 tbsp Dijon mustard

:: 1/2 cup blueberries (or any other kind of berries)

:: half a lemon's juice

:: 1 teaspoon sesame

:: 1 teaspoon chopped pine nuts

:: finely chopped rosemary

:: freshly ground pepper and salt

Procedure:

Mix all the ingredients together and pour them over your salad. The dressing fits perfectly over green salads.

Bon appetit.

Salad dressing with blueberries, dijon mustard, olive oil & sesam | In Whirl of Inspiration 4
Salad dressing with blueberries, dijon mustard, olive oil & sesam | In Whirl of Inspiration 5

The taste of this dressing is a bit tricky, but I am expecting to hear your feedback on that.
 

Credits | Text & Photo: Debbie Kortes

4 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

How to Make: Pesto

homemade+pesto1.jpg

We will start from the basics. Who doesn't love pesto? And I don't mean this in the supermarkets (whose texture reminds me more of an illness ), but the homemade one that will fill your home's air with a delicious smell. Alternatively, if you have time no at all, you can search for some fresh store-bought pestos (in the deli sections of the supermarkets). This one touches a little bit the perfection of homemade pesto. Just a little, by a little click.

homemade+pesto.jpg

Ingredients (makes 1/2 jar)

:: 2-3 large handfuls of fresh basil leaves

:: 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

:: 1/4 cup pine nuts

:: 1/3 cup olive oil

:: 1 clove garlic

:: 1/4 teaspoon of salt and plenty of grounded pepper

Procedure:

Mash all ingredients in the blender or you can do the same thing by hand with a mortar and pestle. I , personally, will go for a not-evenly porridge pesto, as in that case I can't taste the flavors. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week.

So, this pesto will be your homework for today and tomorrow I will show you 3 of my favorite pesto recipes. Deal?

2 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!