Close up photos of a Giant Moth

close up photos of a giant moth

During my Easter vacation I happened to come across a really big (she was half of my palm) moth. All of a sudden, when I opened a metallic door I heard a desperate hovering below below it. And there she was, one of her wings was caught under the door and it was mildly injured. So the only reason that she didn't fly away to avoid my snooper camera was cause she just couldn't. 

During the rescue process I managed to pull her as gently as I could:

close up photos of a giant moth
close up photos of a giant moth

But look at these "eyes" on her wings. Such a spectacular back, don't you think? And a great defense stratedy. These structures are mistaken by the bird for big eyes of a creature hiding so they balk to attack them.

close up photos of a giant moth
close up photos of a giant moth
close up photos of a giant moth
close up photos of a giant moth
close up photos of a giant moth

PS. I am now more sure than ever that I have to invest in a good macro lens. Yeah sure.

8 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Finches, Robins & Sparrows Close Ups

Robin Close Ups.jpg

So now that you learned how to make bird feeders, I can show you the photos of my visitors. For 2 weeks between their feeding time –aka 15:00-16:00 , 1-2hs before the sun sets-, me and daddy were rushing between 6 windows and 2 levels for a good shot. After the first days we knew their spots and in order to have a clear field of vision we should run between 4 windows in our home's ground level and 2 in our semi-basement. And all these for the 1-2 mins that would stay still to eat. It was an ecstatic experience for sure.

So here's what you managed to caught, not bad not bad at all.

Firstly there were the sparrows. Noisy and pesky they didn't let no other birds to come close to the feeders. We were desperate. Was that the end of a great effort? Would we photograph only these masters of fuss? Tweaks, flies and squabbles over the dry bread. From afar they look like wearing total grey suits, but through the lenses shades of brown, yellow and black are analyzed. What beautiful details they have.

BUT, we weren't so unlucky. Cause in the end of the day there was still food in the feeders. Bamm! The sparrows couldn't open the sunflower seeds with their lil’ beaks. After a day or two, here they come the finches, selective and majestic with their yellow bellies and cobalt backs. They would grab a seed and go up on the pomegranate tree, secure the seed between their legs and break the pod to reach the little treasure inside. Then they would go back for another seed, back on the tree and then they were gone until the next day.

The robins were the most elusive to catch up. Normally they would find a tree in the the opposite plot or a secure spot on our tall fence to scan the area for cats, for 15', completely still. You would be lucky to locate them like this. Such an easy peasy photoshooting if there weren't visual obstacles on your way. Then he would rush to the feeder, he would grab a sunflower seed and disappear for the rest of the day. So, as I said before, we were trying to shoot these photos for 2 weeks and you managed to have some good robin's ones only the 3 last days.

However, I can't say they don't deserve it. What flaming necks!

 

Credits: Photos by: Daddy & Deborah Cortes (thanks Daddy!)

All photos were taken with my Canon 600D with the 75-300mm tele lens attached, in case you wonder :)

4 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan

Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan

Well since Kaimaktsalan's Ski Center (at Voras Mountains) is one of my all-time favorite destinations as soon as everything gets white and chilly outside, I was very curious for a long time to see these ice cold landscapes only with their summer clothes on. All this familiar frozen & illusive beauty being so green and roaring, well that's quite a surprise.

We started hiking from the mountain's foot and till the 1600m we were surrounded by oak and other deciduous trees. Green foliage roofs on the top shadowing the sea of ferns down, on their foot. If you were totally careless, you would trample a carpet of  teeny tiny strawberries just above the ground. Little vaults of nectar, that what these strawberries were all about.

Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan

After the bright, saturated greens, the color pallet changed a little bit.  From the 1600m (and till the 1700m. ) we entered the conifer zone. Majestic pines and firs were dueling for a place in the sky, while down below them, on the ground, another small world is thriving. The blueberries and the mushrooms are gabbling with little cute butterflies dancers.

Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan

And finally, the alpine tundra zone. Above 1700m and till the mountain's peak, which is the Kaimaktsalan* located at 2.524m., there are only low grasses. There was nothing to resemble the white enchanting slopes. And oh gosh, the ski lifts (at 2.016m.) are so odd standing there between noisy cicadas and gurgling water springs.  Nevertheless, the view was amazing as always.

*Kaimaktsalan is a word with Turkish origin and means White (=Kaimak)- peak (=tsalan) 

 

 

The Mountain Voras outspreading until FYROM. 

The Mountain Voras outspreading until FYROM. 

Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Hiking at Voras mountain: from its foothills till its Kaimaktsalan
Wild oregano flowers

Wild oregano flowers

For more hiking adventures. check our wandering at Kare Dere's Virgin Forest

xo

6 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

The Extraordinary Creatures Called Humpback Whales

via  Darren Jew  

Photographing moments like this would be a dream come true.  I kinda envy Mr. Darren for his job, he is the Australian science, environment and nature photographer of the year 2012 for mother whale's sake. What a enviable way to earn your livelihood, I am gonna cry.

via  Darren Jew  
via  Darren Jew  

Plus here take -cause it's Sunday and you are awesome-  this rare capture by Jenny Dean, of an albino Humpback whale, strongly believed to be Migaloo, the only documented white humpback whale in the world.

Happy whalish Sunday!  :)

2 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Black & White Beauty

Zebras turning heads, Ngorongoro Crater, 2005

Zebras turning heads, Ngorongoro Crater, 2005

The other day I used some photos through the lense of Nick Brandt, for a bag that I was making (I will show it to you) and it took me much more time to make it than I was expecting. And that's because I was lost in these magnifique pictures of Africa, conjuring up stories about safaries and adventures in the vast savannah. Here it is, a truly epic vision of Africa. Enjoy the voyage!

(left) Leopard in crook of tree, Nakuru, 2007-(right) Lion Before Storm, Mas Mara, 2006

(left) Leopard in crook of tree, Nakuru, 2007-(right) Lion Before Storm, Mas Mara, 2006

Elephants Walking Through Grass, Amboseli, 2008

Elephants Walking Through Grass, Amboseli, 2008

Lioness with feeding cubs, Masai Mara, 2007

Lioness with feeding cubs, Masai Mara, 2007

(left) Two giraffes battling in sun, Maasai Mara, 2006 - (right) Lions Head to Head, Masai Mara, 2008

(left) Two giraffes battling in sun, Maasai Mara, 2006 - (right) Lions Head to Head, Masai Mara, 2008

Wildebeest Arc, Maasai Mara, 2006

Wildebeest Arc, Maasai Mara, 2006

(left)  Ranger with Tusks of Killed Elephant, Amboseli, 2011 - (right) Abandoned Ostrich Egg, Amboseli, 2007

(left)  Ranger with Tusks of Killed Elephant, Amboseli, 2011 - (right) Abandoned Ostrich Egg, Amboseli, 2007

{all photos by:  Nick Brandt}

 ❤

8 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!