How to make the most colorful confetti earrings

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration

If it's not your first time in this site, you might have noticed that I go crazy making colorful and strange things and wearing them with pride and joy in public. In this list of diys first come the necklaces made from unexpected materials and second the earrings. And althought I am cursed to be allergic in all kinds of metalllic materials that penetrates my earlobe, I don't have the biggest collection of big, dramatic earrings (as I would love to). Only some clipped, light ones. With that said, clipped and covered with confetti will be today's happy earrings.

And to make long story short,  I proudly presnt you the diy that will make your day!

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration

What you will need: colorful confetti , atlacoll (also called wood glue), PVC sheet, earrings clips or regular ones, scissors, silicone gun (optional)

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration

1. First draw your earring's shape on a piece of paper. Then Put the sheet of PVC on the patron and copy it. Cut your shape and voila.

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration

2. Apply a thin layer of atlacoll on one side of the earring and dip it into confetti. The purpose of this fun procedure is to cover all the side with confetti, without leaving naked glue parts (the glue turns transparent when it dries so you don't want transparent gaps). Let it to dry and apply do the same on the other side too. I would recommend applying 2 layers of confetti in the front side. Repeat the same with the other earring.

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration

3. If you want to give the earring a rotation better do it as long as the glue doesn't dry, cause otherwise your earring will stop being flexible. When they are absolutely dry, using the silicone pistol glue the earring clips on the back side. If you don't have a silicone gun, you can always do the same with a little ammount of atlacoll. Afterwards secure any almost-flting cobfetti and cut the excess confetti from the edges.

How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration
How to make the most colorful confetti earrings | In Whirl of Inspiration

4. Wear your new cuties and collect your friends' compliments. Arent't they absolutely perfect?

And with an excess of excitement I announce you that you can buy a customized pair of the earrings in our etsy shop or buy an diy kit to make them on your own.

Credits | Writing & Photographs : Debbie Kortes

8 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Recycled lamp fixture made from paper towel rolls & aluminum foil

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My kitchen’s lamp fixture was a bare lamp holder for a long time, since I didn’t know what to do with it. You know that I spend so much time in the kitchen preparing delis, so if I was going to have a lamp fixture it would be something that would create  a nice focused light. And also I was collecting kitchen paper towel rolls for a long time with out knowing what I would like to do with them.

Until it hit me, a lamp fixture made by kitchen paper rolls.  Boom!

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Supplies: kitchen paper rolls, aluminum foil, silicone glue gun, atlacoll, brown recycled wrapping paper (or another piece of paper or fabric), jar’s cap, X-acto knife

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1. Cut the kitchen paper roll alongside, with the knife and end up with an open rectangle.

2. At the bottom corner of the rectangular put liquid silicone and glue that corner with the next triangle’s one diagonally. Press it for some seconds and it’s ready.  

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3. Glue 3-4 of them together and test if they can form a closed cone when wrapped around the lampholder. Better the upper cone's hole to be a little larger than the lampholder diameter, than smaller (for me: 4 rolls end up giving a small upper cone’s hole and the 5 gave a larger one, so I went for the 5 ones)

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4. The internal side of the lamp (the one facing towards the lamp) will be covered with aluminum foil. Don't mind if the foil can be showed to the external side, that one will also be covered with paper. Add silicone glue between the gaps and edges of the aluminum foil, so that you have a compact, solid surface.

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5. Place the open cone on a big piece of recycled brown paper (or any other print or fabric) and draw its pattern. Let 2-3cm of excess paper around its perimeter when cutting it. Fold these 2-3cm “ears” inwards, put silicone on them and glue on the external side of the open cone. Add silicone in any big openings and anywhere else needed. Let it dry and then close the cone and keep it fixed like that using a big metal clip. You can do that with glue too, but I love to idea of hanging and unhanging it whenever I feel so. Plus there is 6. below, where you have to open again the cone. So use a clip. 

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6. There is the possibility that when closing the cone, the upper cone's hole won't stuck on the lampholder (eg. like in my situation). If that happens, so the following. Take an old jar’s cap and find its center. Cut a circle around it (big enough for the lamp’s cable to pass through fit) and cut its radius too. Beware of your fingers and do that on a concrete floor, not on wood or tiles please.

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7. Set the cap-holder around the cable and then on that place the cone-lamp fixture. And it's ready.

The foil in the fixture’s inside creates a very beautiful focused light and because of fixture’s structure the upper side of the room remains some tones darker than the lower part of the room. Nice effect, huh?

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Happy crafting and if you want more home diys check my crafts index here.

2 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

How to make a Magazine Clutch

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Remembering when I was telling you about using some Nick Brands' pictures to make a bag. Well they are two and here they are. Admittedly, the paper crafts are some of my favorites. I like their texture, their appearance, their making process, I like the whole package.

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You will need: a bag (to be your basis), a clear plastic film for covering books, atlacoll (or Mod Podge), magazines, scissors, brush, a plastic disposable container

1. Begin by ripping out your favorite magazine pictures for your clutch.

2. If the bag's fabric is absorbent, cover the bag entirely with the plastic film so that the glue won't be able to contact the fabric.

3. Dissolve atlacoll in water at a ratio of 1:1 in the plastic container and then apply on the bag and start attaching the photos.

4. When dry, repeat with 2-3 more coats (allowing each one to dry before applying the next one), with special emphasis on the corners of the bag.

5. Ready!

Note: I found two bags and I couldn't resist collaging both of them. The smallest one turned out to be a better clutch, because of its more convenient size. However, I use both of them because they match with different types of clothes in my wardrobe.

Also, a big concern of mine was, whether the corners of the bags would be easily worn out (paper is delicate you see). But, considering the fact that I did these bags back in September, with a little careful use (a.k.a. not slogging them here and there) their condition remains perfect. So we have a win-win here!

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So, here's the first one from a little closer. I love, love love, its colors. They are so earthy and vibrant in the same time. I match it with one-color mini dresses or with maxi ones, or whenever my outfit is a little romantic or back-in-the-90s.

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And here's the second one, the one with Nick Brand's photo. I adore its minimal look. This clutch is perfect when I go for total black looks. This and my black leather jacket are the best pals by now.

kisses ❤

4 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Diy: Vintage Kiss Confetti Collage

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For some time now I wanted a pop art piece like these from Roy Lichtenstein for my bedroom. But no. I didn't want I simple printed retro poster of a kissing scene, I wanted more. So, after the lamp bulb confetti covered garland madness, here's vol. 2,a retro tet-a-tet confetti collage.

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Ι used: my (gorgeous red) perforater, some magazine's sheets (choose some with pictures for colorful confetti), some newspapers' sheets, glue (I used atlacoll), a thick brush and a thinner one, scissors, a plastic cup, a square thick paperboard (= the collage's base). Oh and a little water.

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1. We start with the magazine pages. Fold each page in width for around 9 times. So, you will have the maximum confetti per page.

2. Cut the newspapers' pages in middle-sized polygonal pieces. Avoid the parts of the pages, which jave large fonts. Our aim is to create a simple background for our collage and a big header will definitely catch the eye. So this is a no-no.

3. Mix atlacoll with water with an analogy of 4/1,so the that the glue will be to dissolved well. Apply some of the glue mix with the thick brush on the base-board and start placing pieces of newspaper. After  2-3 layers of newspapers' pieces, apply a final layer of glue mix on and let it dry thoroughly.

4. When the base dries well, it's sketch time! For this collage I used this version of the famous retro passionate kisses. Remember that you should only sketch the basics, no details here. Go for the head's and hair's outlines and the eyebrows' and eyes' shape and position. These sketches will be your guide for confetti sticking.

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5. So there we go! For the details (eyelashes, eyebrows, face outlines): With the thin brush, we apply a little glue and carefully put confetti. Do not place one confetti  next to the another one only to follow the outlines or to fill the surfaces. One confetti should overlap the other one, to avoid the dotted-line face outline.

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6. Then with the thick brush fill the larger areas with glue and scatter the confetti there. Leave some parts fully exposed from confetti to show the highlights of the hair (see: the girl's bangs. * Warning: You can change the confetti's position while the glue is still wet, otherwise soak confetti locally with the glue mix to move it easily.

7. Shake the board to drop confetti that hasn't glue on and apply a final layer of glue. Let it dry thoroughly and tadaaaam, you're ready!

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So, your opinion?

21 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Diy: Lamp Bulb Confetti Covered Garland

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Come sit by me, I have a small story for you. As a kid I could spend hours playing with my perforater, creating colorful confetti, until my mum hid it for good. This must was a logical action as I was dropping these tiny papers all over the house, a pain in the ass to be cleaned. Anyway, now many years later I discovered again this magical little device and I am officially addicted again! So, as you can imagine, it is the main hero of this DIY. The second roles are played by some used and seared lamp bulbs, which were predestined to be recycled until I came up with this DIY and gave them a better future. {Side note. Don't forget to recycle what you don't need anymore! End rant.}

So let's see what we have here:

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I used my (gorgeous red) perforater, some magazine's paper sheets (choose some with pictures if you want colorful confetti), a glue (I used atlacoll), a brush, a plastic cup, some used lamp bulbs, newspapers (to cover the floor) and a nice rope. Oh and a little water.

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1. We take some fancy paper sheets. Take some with photos or texts, it depend on what confetti you would like to have. Colorful or black and white? I leave this entirely up on you to choose!

2. Fold the paper (for approximately 9 times). By this,  you will have the maximum confettis per sheet of paper.

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3. We mix atlacoll with the water with an analogy of 4/1. You want  to have your glue dissolved with water, but the final solution should be a little viscous.

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 4. Bind the rope on the end of the bulbs, so that you will have a nice lamp bulb garland. (You can do this in the end too, if you feel that you will be confused with the bulbs, the leaky glue and the confetti everywhere. Yes, it will be a chaos! :) )

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5. Then start covering each bulb with glue and throw the little pieces of paper on. (*Beware*: The glue will leak, so make sure you have spread many newspapers on the floor otherwise you will make a mess! Like really!)

6. Let each lamp bulb to dry for 10' and then repeat filling the areas which have few confettis.

7. Let them dry for about 30' and then cover with the last layer of glue.

8. Let it dry for an hour or two and you are ready!

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That's all. Now hang your lamp bulb -confetti covered- garland somewhere sunny. I preferred a place near to my windows, as I like the sound of the glass when the wind whispers!

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8 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!