A salty and sour sauce for your boiled salads

A salty and sour sauce for your boiled salads | from IN WHIRL OF INSPIRATION

Cold, time for two. And by two I mean you and the heartwarming boiled salad you will prepare today. Or is it only me that I tend to eat so many boiled salads during the cold months; boiled zucchini/broccoli/greens you name it, I love them.  With that said I will show you an easy salty and sour sauce you can make to top your salad, which can also replace all the mayonnaisethat goes into potato salads nowadays and it's not the healthiest thing to consume in big quantities (unless it is a homemade one). This sauce will bring the flavor out of the boiled vegetables without oveloading them, trust me.

A salty and sour sauce for your boiled salads - cutting the scallions | from IN WHIRL OF INSPIRATION

You will need (for topping a salad):

  • ½ tsp Dijon mustard or homemade mustard
  • 2 scallions
  • 1 ½ juicy lemons
  • 2 tablespoons of virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium pickled cucumbers
  • capers
  • freshly ground pepper and a pinch of salt
  • dill

Procedure:

Chop finely the scallions, the capers and the pickled cucumbers and add them in a small jar together with the mustard, olive oil, the lemon juice, the grounded pepper and dill. Close the lid and shake well until the mixture becomes homogeneous. Try and add salt if needed and top your salad with it.

We added a bit of homemade pickled sea fennel on top, but if you don't have some, how about some pickled purslanes?
 

A salty and sour sauce for your boiled salads | from IN WHIRL OF INSPIRATION

And before I wish you bon appetit, what toppings do you use on your boiled vegetables? I am so curious to know, spill the beans in the comments below if you want. xoxo

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Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

How to make pickled purslanes

How to make pickled purslanes

 Winter is coming and the "supplies gathering time" came. Yay!  Growing up it was always a pleasure watching my grandmas and my mum sealing all these vegetables' freshness and magic in jars for the dark cold days that would come. Basically, pickled vegetables, apart from being salty and sour = a total bliss, work totally out with all my favorite winter food. And I mean the soups and roasted meat. So win-win. 

How to make pickled purslanes

The following recipe is a total favorite one that I learned from my grandma and it's a rife one among the Pontiacs in northern Greece. (The quantities depend on the jars' size.)

Ingredients: (for 2 middle jars)

:: 2 big bunches of purslanes

:: white wine's vinegar

:: 3 garlic gloves

:: salt, ground pepper

Procedure:

1) Put the jars and their caps in a pot with boiling water to be sterilized and let them aside when after the first boil. 

2) Wash very well the purslanes to clean them from dirt and any living organism. :) Then, chop off the thick twigs, cut the remaining branches in smaller pieces and give them a boil for 1'-2' with the garlic cloves. Don't leave them for too long, we want them to stay bright green and crunchy.

3) Take the sterilized jars out of the pot with a clean plier. Depending on the jar's size, fill the 1/5 of its volume with white vinegar. Then load the jars with the purslanes, garlic gloves and their water. Add salt and pepper, close tightly their caps and turn them upside down.

4) Wrap them with a towel and leave them like that until they cool. If you intend to eat them in the near future, you could not seal them but cover the surface of the vase with olive oil and keep them for for a week max in the refrigerator.

How to make pickled purslanes
How to make pickled purslanes
How to make pickled purslanes

More -delicious- food in jars to come!

xo

4 Comments

Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!