Green salad with strawberries, flaxseed and violet flowers

Green salad with strawberries, flaxseed and violet flowers

At last! Sun is shining bright and warm, and our courtyards and grocery stores start flourishing with seasonal spring greens. Green salads are in their forte period, so don't forget to accompany every meal with a large salad bowl. One bowl of salad every day and your body will thank you, let's start revolutionizing our diet one meal per day fellas. Salads are the main way (apart from fruits) to get your everyday fibers and vitamins. (I hear you thinking "Yes, mama.", so I will stop right away.)

For this green sensational salad, except from tasty greens, I added a bit of magic in the form of chopped sweet strawberries, flaxseed and violet flowers. Just for a change.

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A pesto alternative: with parsley, strawberries, walnuts and feta cheese

A pesto alternative - with parley, strawberries, walnuts and feta cheese (via inwhirlofinspiration.com)1

You know what's the funniest thing that I have heard? "Why to experiment with an already perfect recipe and possibly ruin it?" Maybe some people agree with this, but I don't. Who can define a dish as perfect? And why not try making it more perfect? defined it as perfect? And why not try to do it even more perfect?
An already-close-to-perfection recipe. It gives character to many dishes. But it could be modified to fit with the season's vegetable and fruits or with various local products. This alternative pesto recipe contains parsley and strawberries that are everywhere this season, walnuts instead of pine seeds and feta cheese (so cliche Greek) instead of parmesan. And let the summer vibe rush over your dishes.

A pesto alternative - with parley, strawberries, walnuts and feta cheese (via inwhirlofinspiration.com) 3

Ingredients (for 1 bowl pesto):

1 large bunch of parsley
100 gr. of feta cheese
15-20 medium strawberries
2 cloves of garlic
2 handfuls of walnuts
2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
oregano, salt and pepper

Procedure:

The process is simple: cutting, cutting and more cutting. You can cut all the ingredients on a large board, starting with the toughest and largest pieces (eg. walnuts and garlic) and continue with the softest ones. Then in a big bowl add the chopped ingredients, the olive oil and spices, stir, taste and add anything that misses according to your taste.
The other method is to mash all ingredients in a blender, so much quicker and cleaner, but I don't like the mashed-all-together outcome.  All textures are mashed together and the color is ehmmm not my favorite. ;) But as you wish, serve over bread as a snack or with savory dishes.

A pesto alternative - with parley, strawberries, walnuts and feta cheese (via inwhirlofinspiration.com) 2

If this version is too experimental for you, you can always return to the old safe classic pesto recipe. And here are three of my favorite ways to serve the pesto: on corn on the cob with feta cheese (omg!), with gnocchi and in a quick santwich tomato, prosciutto and a fried egg. 

Credits | Words & photos: Debbie Kortes

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Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!

Strawberry & Walnuts Baked Brie

Strawberry & Walnuts Baked Brie Recipe

So the other day I made these superb cheese, mushroom & rosemary crackers and instead of eating them all bare. I had to find for them an appropriate topping. The answer for this is one and only one; cheese and fruits. Yeah I am that predictable. So, I tried strawberries and walnuts baked brie and it was gone in minutes.

Strawberry & Walnuts Baked Brie Ingredients for Recipe

Strawberry & Walnuts Baked Brie (for 1 person)

Ingredients:

:: 200gr of brie

:: 1/4 cup of walnuts

:: 1/2 of chopped strawberries

:: 1/4 tsp chopped (fresh) rosemary

:: a little ground salt and pepper
 

Procedure:

Preheat oven to 250°C.

Mix walnuts, strawberries, rosmary, salt and pepper in a bowl. Squash the strawberries a bit and let the mixture stay for the aromas to mix.

Place half of the mixture on top of brie. Flip & repeat.

Bake for 5-7 minutes, until it's nice and oozy. Serve along with your crackers.

To answer: "Can I eat the white skin, which surrounds brie?" - Yes, you can, cause it's an edible mold. The skin is formed naturally by molds and bacteria on the surface of the cheese. It starts out as fine white hairs and grows to what the French call 'poil de cha't, or cat fur. The fur is then rubbed off, and underneath is a thin rind encasing the nearly fluid interior of the brie. The rind protects brie from the air and delays drying and loss of flavor. If you remove the rind, you should eat the creamy center within a day or so.

Whether you eat the rind or not is up to you, some people do like it, others don't. The rind has a rather tangy/earthly tasting, and some people think it is the best part of the brie. A brie's rind should feel firm and silky, not hard and crusty, and can be eaten alone or mixed on the bread with the cheese.

Strawberry & Walnuts Baked Brie Recipe
Strawberry & Walnuts Baked Brie and rosemary and mushroom crackers

Bon appétit!

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Déspina Kortesidou

Déspina Kortesidou was born with the April flowers sometime in the '90s in the sunny peninsula of Greece. She is a graduating master student of neuroscience & metabolism, and a born adventurer.

(3rd person statements sound so official, love it)

She founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student, in the island of Crete. In Whirl of Inspiration started as a creative and writing outlet for when studying molecules, became too monotonous. Recently, she started writing a children book and a not-so-children's book about the civil war in Greece. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people, and (her own) jokes, but can't tell any as she ruins them by laughing too early. She enjoys sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring people to cover themshelves with plants, color and confetti.

Feel free to email her at hello@inwhirlofinspiration.com, or find her on Instagram and Twitter. (breaking the 3rd person narration to thank you properly)

Thank you so much for reading!